Broadcast Media


Review the Learning Resources for the week before answering the week 3 discussion. the resources are attached files. include question on paper. due date is 30 January 2019 at 1:00pm eastern time zone.

Please reply to this post with your response to the following questions in regard to broadcast media. Be sure to reference material from your textbook to validate your points as you answer these questions:

A) Is there any value left in the big-screen movie experience? 

B) Will online streaming video overtake the other motion-medias? Why or why not? 

C) How can broadcast television change to remain competitive and can you cite any examples of programming changes that they have made to do so already? How does “free content” in television play into this? 

D) After reading “21st Century Commuication: A Reference Handbook: Chapter 96: Radio and Television Programming,” explain how cable TV was instrumental in leading to greater demassification (look it up if you don’t know what it means) of media content. 

Parasocial Relationships Assigment (Media & Society)

include questions to the paper and see attached files for the sources. due  31 January 2019 at 1:00pm eastern time zone. 

After studying the assigned reading The Handbook of Communication Science, Second Edition: Chapter 20: Media Entertainment, considering the topic of parasocial relationships, answer the following questions or prompts.

A) Identify a character in a show with whom you have developed (in the past or present) a parasocial relationship. Remember, this personal can be “real” or a character role. Explain why this character/person is compelling to you. 

B) How do you “know” or view this character outside of their role on the show? Have they influenced you in any way besides the aspect of entertainment? 

C) Explain any emotional attachment to the character or person. Have they disappointed you? Motivated you? How and why?  

Support your responses with research from the Learning Resources. Use APA in-text citations where necessary and cite any outside sources. Create an APA Reference List or Bibliography at the end of the document. 

communication exam 3

QUESTION 1

1. The Helical Model presents an economic view of relationships, wherein relational partners weigh rewards and costs of a relationship.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 2

1. Stage models of relationships are universally applicable, and do a good job of addressing cultural differences.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 3

1. Coaches and work supervisors typically have which kind(s) of power over their athletes/employees?

a.reward and coercive power
b.legitimate power
c.information power
d.both a and b above
e.all of the above

1 points   

QUESTION 4

1. In Social Exchange theory, the idea that in close relationships, a relational partner may allow costs to outweigh benefits is a concept known as:

communal relationships
comparison level of alternatives
supply-demand analysis
none of the above

1 points   

QUESTION 5

1. When you disclose some information about your family to a new friend in hopes that your new friend will share about her family too, the main reason for your self-disclosure is:

catharsis
self-clarification
reciprocity
impression management

1 points   

QUESTION 6

1. In the relationship theory of Dialectics, the main goal is to eliminate the tensions in the relationship.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 7

1. There is one main type of conflict style that is useful in a specific type of conflict situation, regardless of the people and factors involved. 

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 8

1. All of the following are key dimensions of interpersonal relationships,  except:

interdependence
breadth
understanding and predictability
intersecting identity cycles

1 points   

QUESTION 9

1. Dialectics is one approach to understanding interpersonal relationships in which the main focus is on:

assertive communication
conflict management
balancing multiple relationships
balancing opposing tensions

1 points   

QUESTION 10

1. Brianna and Latoya both have their ears pierced because Amira, the most popular girl in their class, had hers pierced. This is an example of what kind of power?

referent power
information power
reward power
expert power

1 points   

QUESTION 11

1. Which approach to relationships focuses on cycles of dis/integration and re/synthesis that relationships go through?

Helical model
Social Exchange Model
Stage Model
Dialectics

1 points   

QUESTION 12

1. Paola wants to enjoy spending their money now and to not worry about the future; Valentine wants to skimp a little today to ensure that they can enjoy life in the future. These conflicting views are an example of _______.

fact conflict
value conflict
pseudo-conflict
ego conflict

1 points   

QUESTION 13

1. Marcus, who used to think nothing of driving across town to pick up Anne-Helene for a date, is now having second thoughts about the time it takes to get to her house. His reconsideration of whether he should continue doing so is based on:

Schutz’s balance theory
Heider’s balance theory
Maslow’s needs theory
Thibault and Kelley’s exchange theory 

1 points   

QUESTION 14

1. Henry’s wife is aware that he snores in his sleep and exhibits nervous mannerisms sometimes when he communicates, but Henry is unaware that he does these things. These things would fall under the _______ quadrant of Henry’s Johari window.

open
secret or hidden
blind  
unknown

1 points   

QUESTION 15

1. Jose works hard for Kentaro in hopes that Kentaro will recommend him for a promotion. In this specific example which form of Kentaro’s power over Jose is most clearly demonstrated?

legitimate power
coercive power
reward power
expert power

1 points   

QUESTION 16

1. All of the following are types of relational dialectics except:

autonomy-connection
novelty-predictability
openness-closedness
all are types of relational dialectics

1 points   

QUESTION 17

1. Choosing to self-disclose something as a way to give off a certain idea about yourself on a first date is known as:

Reciprocity
Catharsis
Impression management
Self-clarification

1 points   

QUESTION 18

1. In the termination stage of a relationship, people may use:

strategies of manipulation
strategies of avoidance
strategies of withdrawal 
all of the above  

1 points   

QUESTION 19

1. In Social Exchange Theory, Thibaut and Kelley suggest that people want relationships:

that offer rewards without any costs
that offer high rewards and little costs
no matter the costs
that have an equal amount of cost and rewards

1 points   

QUESTION 20

1. Terrell’s parents wish him to be more open with them. So he chooses to disclose more about events at school, but not reveal any more information about his relationship with Sam. This is an example of:

topical segmentation  
neutralization
reframing
reporting

1 points   

QUESTION 21

1. Self-disclosure is always a positive experience in interpersonal relationships.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 22

1. When you ask for feedback,

you are obligated to act on it
you should be sure you are ready for an honest response
making rational choices about changing your behavior becomes impossible
you can be sure that you will receive a compliment

1 points   

QUESTION 23

1. The need for ____________ reflects a desire to influence the events and people around us.

inclusion
oversocial
exchange
control 

1 points   

QUESTION 24

1. A main criticism of stage models of relationships such as Knapp’s is that they are not prescriptive and structured enough – that they don’t show what stage relational partners may experience next.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 25

1. The idea that we want to bond with others, yet we also want to retain our independence in our lives illustrates which dialectical tension?

connection-autonomy
stability-change
openness-closedness
progression-tradition

1 points   

QUESTION 26

1. As the self-disclosure of one person increases, the self-disclosure of the other person usually:

decreases
becomes more positive
becomes less personal
increases

1 points   

QUESTION 27

1. Choosing to self-disclose something to provide a “release” (get it off your chest) is called:

Catharsis
Self-validation
Psychological reasoning
Impression management

1 points   

QUESTION 28

1. When offering ____________, preface a negative statement with a positive one whenever possible.

praise
self-disclosure
opinions
constructive criticism  

1 points   

QUESTION 29

1. Javier knows that he has difficulty distinguishing colors. He does not disclose this information to his friends. This information falls into the __________ quadrant of his Johari window.

open
secret or hidden
blind
unknown

1 points   

QUESTION 30

1. When people see other choices available and they weigh their options to continue in a relationship, they are engaging in:

comparison level of alternatives
interactive relationship development strategies
uncertainty reduction strategies
active relationship development strategies

1 points   

QUESTION 31

1. Which of the following represent ‘particularistic rewards’ in Social Exchange theory?

love, time, information, services
time, love, status, money
information, goods, services
goods, services, status, time

1 points   

QUESTION 32

1. There are several alternatives to self-disclosure that we covered in class. Which of the following is not one of those alternatives?

Lying
Equivocating
Hinting
Truth-telling

1 points   

QUESTION 33

1. All of the following are dimensions of intimacy that we discussed in class, except:

Physical
Intellectual
Shared Activities
Behavioral

1 points   

QUESTION 34

1. Which of the following are characteristics for effective self-disclosure?

It occurs incrementally
It is affected by culture
It is usually symmetrical
All of the above 

1 points   

QUESTION 35

1. According to interpersonal needs theory, people who have a high need to be around others are called:

open
oversocials
needy
autocrats

1 points   

QUESTION 36

1. Which of the following is a relationship stage that is characterized by personal rituals and a combined social identity including “we” and “us” language?

differentiating
experimenting
intensifying
integrating

1 points   

QUESTION 37

1. Owning feelings and taking responsibility for your choices involves:

making “I” statements  
taking the credit for what others have done
granting advantages to others
properly assessing strengths

1 points   

QUESTION 38

1. In Dialectics theory, internal dialectics refer to the tensions within the relationship while external dialectics refer to the tensions between the couple and others (in their social circles).

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 39

1. Developing friendships with your relational partner’s friends is one strategy used to ___________ a relationship.

maintain  
de-escalate
activate
dissolve

1 points   

QUESTION 40

1. In dialectical theory, selecting one side of a relational contradiction and ignoring the other side is called temporal selection.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 41

1. There are no legitimate reasons for choosing privacy over self-disclosure in close relationships.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 42

1. Which theorist(s) asserted that, “Whether a relationship is started, built, or maintained depends on how well each person meets the needs of the other”

Schutz 
Knapp and Vangelisti
Burgoon
Thibaut and Kelly

1 points   

QUESTION 43

1. One of the most important elements of the beginnings of relationships is the need to reduce

the open quadrant
interaction
uncertainty  
escalation

1 points   

QUESTION 44

1. Len reports that the first contract for their company was signed on February 14, but Nora says it was signed on January 19. The conflict that ensues is a(n) _________________.

fact conflict
value conflict
pseudo-conflict
ego conflict 

1 points   

QUESTION 45

1. Which of the following is NOT an interpersonal need according to Schutz?

affection
inclusion
emotion
control

1 points   

QUESTION 46

1. Which of the following is a relationship stage that sometimes occurs after bonding when partners express a need for increased privacy or autonomy?

differentiating
experimenting
intensifying
circulating

1 points   

QUESTION 47

1. In Knapp’s stage model of coming together and coming apart, which of the following is not a stage?

intensifying              
closure
bonding
stagnating

1 points   

QUESTION 48

1. One underlying assumption of dialectics is that change is a constant in relationships.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 49

1. Rewards are outcomes that are not valued by a person.

 True

 False

1 points   

QUESTION 50

1. Dalia shared very personal information about herself with Ramy. Later in the day, Ramy’s friends asked him about Dalia and her secret. Ramy has ______________ power because of his knowledge of Dalia’s private information and his choice to share it or not.

referent power
information power
reward power
coercive power

1 points   

QUESTION 51

1. Having regular “Monday night discussions”  with your  boyfriend/girlfriend (or your husband/wife) that are intended to help you understand one another better represent which main reason for self-disclosure?

relational maintenance
catharsis
impression management
manipulation

1 points   

QUESTION 52

1. The idea that interpersonal relationships involve shared scripts – phrases, idioms, personal references – refers to which key dimension of interpersonal relationships?

communication language system
communication code change
paralanguage
intimate relationship communication

Reading And Writing

When Checks and Balances Fail

In February 2017, Dr. Christopher Duntsch became the first surgeon in American history known to be sentenced to prison for botching a patient surgery. A licensed neurosurgeon, Duntsch left a string of deaths and maimed bodies in his wake: He was accused of causing the death of two surgery patients and leaving 33 others permanently damaged. His patients left their lives in his hands; he left them paralyzed or dead.

The checks and balances that were supposed to contain Duntsch failed utterly. His medical school licensed him but didn’t require the preparation necessary to instill competence. Hospitals suspended him but didn’t report him. The medical board could do nothing without forms filed against him. Patients were left without recourse.

When checks and balances fail, damage is usually the result.

That’s why when it came to our system of government, the founders were so focused on creating gridlock. They recognized that in a system in which legitimacy sprang from popular support, the easy path to perdition lay in popularly backed centralized power — tyranny could spring just as easily from a popular majority as from a king or despot. The founders didn’t trust individuals with authority, and they didn’t trust human beings to delegate authority to mere individuals.

But popular governments have always bucked against such limitations. 

The majority of Americans always want action, on some grounds or others. That leads to an eternal drive to grant unchecked power to some institution of government. As Alexis de Tocqueville writes in his 1840 “Democracy in America”: “It may easily be foreseen that almost all the able and ambitious members of a democratic community will labor without ceasing to extend the powers of government, because they all hope at some time or other to wield those powers. … Centralization will be the natural government.”

We’re now seeing the consequences of such centralization on two separate fronts: the president’s authority to declare a national emergency and the FBI’s investigations into the president. Proponents of President Trump would like to see power centralized in the presidency; antagonists of President Trump would like to see power centralized in the FBI.

President Trump’s allies seem eager for Trump to declare a national emergency in order to appropriate funds for a border wall. The law cuts against such a declaration: The National Emergencies Act was written to curtail presidential authority, not increase it. No matter how much border hawks (including me) want a border barrier, the proper method is to request funds from Congress.

Meanwhile, President Trump’s enemies are celebrating reports this week that the FBI investigated Trump as a possible Russian agent after his firing of then-FBI director James Comey. Trump had authority under the Constitution to fire Comey, and there’s no actual evidence that Trump is an agent of the Russians. But Trump’s enemies want the legislature to step in and attempt to protect the FBI from executive branch checks on it.  

We’re now seeing the consequences of such centralization on two separate fronts: the president’s authority to declare a national emergency and the FBI’s investigations into the president. Proponents of President Trump would like to see power centralized in the presidency; antagonists of President Trump would like to see power centralized in the FBI.

President Trump’s allies seem eager for Trump to declare a national emergency in order to appropriate funds for a border wall. The law cuts against such a declaration: The National Emergencies Act was written to curtail presidential authority, not increase it. No matter how much border hawks (including me) want a border barrier, the proper method is to request funds from Congress.

Meanwhile, President Trump’s enemies are celebrating reports this week that the FBI investigated Trump as a possible Russian agent after his firing of then-FBI director James Comey. Trump had authority under the Constitution to fire Comey, and there’s no actual evidence that Trump is an agent of the Russians. But Trump’s enemies want the legislature to step in and attempt to protect the FBI from executive branch checks on it.

Scott Morefield

All of this is foolish. It’s good that the legislative branch checks the executive branch, and it’s good that the executive branch must remain in control of executive branch agencies. Here’s the easy test: How would you feel if the situations were reversed? How would Republicans feel about an emergency declaration from a Democratic president to shift funds to leftist priorities? How would Democrats feel about Republican attempts to seize control of the FBI for purposes of investigating a Democratic president?Nobody ought to trust institutions enough to grant them unchecked power. And no one ought to trust the people enough to allow us to do so.

Ben Shapiro, 35, is a graduate of UCLA and Harvard Law School, host of “The Ben Shapiro Show” and editor-in-chief of DailyWire.com. He is The New York Times best-selling author of “Bullies.” He lives with his wife and two children in Los Angeles.